FINALLY a Floor – part 2

Are you still dancing naked in the streets about my laundry room tile?

Well, go put some clothes on because I don’t want you to be reading this post and have some perv hack your webcam.

Unless you are into that.  In which case…carry on.

So we talked about our laundry room tile prep work.  And how we got to the point of picking out tile.  And how we use premixed thinset to adhere the tile to the concrete backer board.  I forgot to mention that during this time (the thinsetting the tile) it is really really wise to use flexible mesh tape on the seams.  Our local home improvement store had none in stock when we bought the tile and since the big Georgia Apocolypse snow-storm hit two days later (right when we got to the point of tiling), I decided to move ahead and tile because dude…I need to wash clothes.  every.  day.

Some folks say that the board tape doesn’t matter…and I admittedly have done tiling before without it…but it is necessary if you want your cement board warranty to not be void.  People use tape because it makes the boards into one big piece which can reduce the chances of cracks in your boards affecting your tile.  So if your state doesn’t shut down due to three inches of snow, use tape.  The best tip I can give ya is shmear that thinset into the crack, press the tape into the thinset with your trowel and then do another layer of thinset.

I have blogged so much about tiling in the past, I decided that you don’t need to hear that same info again.  I am just posting new info here folks.  If you are interested in reading about other tile adventures, here are some old tiling posts:

When we got to the vent, it took a particular set of cuts to make sure the tile went around the opening.

For one piece of tile, it meant cutting it in a C shape.  I marked the outline of the area we needed cut with tape.  Then I told Jer to cut the thin little cuts right next to each other.  He repeatedly asked me if I knew what I was talking about…

When he brought it back inside, I simply tapped on the ends of the little tile fingerlings to make them break.

The top will look much cleaner than the bottom (seen below).

Right about here is where I got really tired.  Like I basically wanted to cry.  I think this is a normal reaction in most DIY adventures…there is a breaking point.  A point of no return but no desire to move forward.  Or maybe that is just me and my pregnancy hormones.  I mean…I don’t see the Kitchen Cousins breaking down.

Speaking of pregnancy…it’s a running joke with Jeremy and I that if I am tiling something, I have to be pregnant.

I was preggo with Will when I tiled the basement laundry room in our first house…

And pregnant with Weston when I tiled the backsplash in our kitchen…

And definitely pregnant this time around.

I hope that means we will have a little DIYer in utero :)

The good news is…I didn’t die.  Almost.  But not quite.

I did feel like this though with all the heartburn…

After waiting 24 hours for the thinset to cure, I decided it was time to grout.  We used this unsanded grout in Warm Gray from Mapei.

My favorite tool to mix grout (and paint and pancake batter, etc.) is one of these long stemmed mixer attachments.  It goes into your drill and you can just go to town.

I had to do this in two sections.  That’s what I could reach.  I would really push it into the lines (the tiles are butted up to one another leaving a very small grout line due to rounded edges) and then move on.  Honestly, the grouting process took five minutes to smear in….twenty minutes of waiting…and then thirty minutes of wiping.

Usually we have two people doing this part….Jer will do the rinsing of the sponges and I do all the wiping.  It just wasn’t possible in such a small space with two kids that were dying to go play in the snow (ok ok…Weston hated the snow…but he did like watching Will play).

With any tiling project there is always the dreaded haze.  I have only two tips on how to deal with this tile fog…A. tackle it in the first 24 hours and 2.  I wipe with clean water 2-3 times and diluted vinegar once and then use Clorox wipes.  That’s a lot of wiping.  Not as much as a potty training mommy but still…

After the washer and dryer got moved back inside, I could really tell how much of a difference a floor can make.

It might be my favorite floor tile job I have ever done.  It’s really nice for this space.  It’s not super slick or anything…in fact, it does feel different than normal tile.  I can’t really describe it.

I am liking the light color too.  I know it might be one of those controversial things – light colored floors – because wouldn’t they show EVERY SPECK of dirt?  especially in a room that typically sees a lot of that dirt?  Well, yes…it does show dirt more than the “Magic Eye” tile that was in there before…but I kinda like that it hides some but not all.  It forces me to keep it vacuumed.

And now for the side by side…

 

Huge difference right!?

I can not wait to get the counter in and some storage in there.  And maybe some finishing touches.  I have little newborn clothes I need to wash after all :)

Comments

  1. says

    We used that same tile from Lowe’s in our new basement bathroom (the 18×24 size) and it looks so expensive (but totally not)! We went to the store with the intention of buying their calcutta marble-looking tile but grabbed this stuff instead and so glad we did!

  2. Stephanie P says

    Love the light tile with the dark walls. Because it’s such a tight room, would it have been possible to move the washer/dryer to the window wall giving you more wiggle room?

    • says

      It still makes me smile… but like I said before…it robably won’t stay that way forever. I love the idea of having a big wall that I could repaint with fun things (kinda like Drew Barrymore did in 50 First Dates) but this might not be the right wall for it because you can barely see it because you can’t back up far enough.
      xo – kb

  3. Lisa L. says

    We have that same tile in our guest bathroom and LOVE it. People comment on it all the time how great (and spa-like) it looks!

  4. says

    Wow! I love that! I didn’t even know they made tile that looked like wood! I have to say you are amazing! How many woman that are prego would do that? Now I feel totally lazy! Now go lay down! Lol xo, Kathy

  5. Melody Strayer says

    Love it! We just got new plank style tile in our playroom, and I love the look! Question for you– do you plan to do any kind of transition piece (I think yours looks fine without)? But we have an area of the plank tiles into square tiles and I want to make it look more finished.

    • says

      We are not gonna do a transition piece. Some folks do…some don’t when it comes to tile meeting hardwood. I think that it definitely would need that perpendicular wood piece (you can see that in the photos) otherwise we would DEFINITELY do a threshold or a transitional piece. If you want to add more finish to two tiles, you may want to consider taking your plank and turning it perpendicular to create a visual end. It may help…may not but at least it would be the easiest option!
      xo – kb

  6. says

    Curious question… What did you use to cut the tile? I’ve been putting off our hall bathroom for awhile because putting stick on tiles again would be just ridiculous, but we also don’t have the big wet saw equipment for tiling. Is that the only option and option you and Jeremy use for tiling?

    • says

      We used a Ryobi wet tile saw. It comes with a stand and it is really nice to not have to crouch down to cut the tile. We have a manual tile cutter but honestly…with as much as we tile (and as much as we lend out our tile saw) it was well worth the investment.
      xo – kb

  7. says

    Katie, Love how the floor turned out – looks great! Makes me excited to get the tile down that has been sitting in my garage for the last six months!

  8. Sylly D says

    I love how you did the ‘c’ cut in the tile (for the vent I think), would you mind posting a picture of what that looked life from the top? I’m getting ready to tile our bathroom and we will have to do a similar cut. I suspect the top of the tile doesn’t matter that much since the vent cover will hide it right?

    Anyhow, thank you for sharing!

    • says

      Sorry I don’t have one. I could take a photo of it with the vent cover on top (it is on right now) but we used caulk to set it on and I don’t really wanna have to redo that. Would that even be helpful?
      xo – kb

  9. Kelly says

    Just wanted to thank you for being the inspiration my husband needed to agree for us to tile our downstairs bathroom. We were “scared” to try tiling ourselves because of the mysterious thin set/grout process. But after I showed you tiling while being pregnant (three times!) he’s feeling more courageous :) Thanks to you we won’t be making the “lame” choice of peel and stick. Much thanks!

    • says

      Haha! I’m glad my bulge helped him get some courage :) It really is quite simple. I recommend watching a few youtube videos on the proper angle for thinsetting…but that is seriously the hardest part! Good luck!
      xo – kb

  10. Renae says

    I LOVE! We saw those tiles at Lowe’s last week, we’re redoing our laundry room too. Or should I say “doing” our laundry room because let’s face it, it’s been subfloor since 201o. But I want to know about your quarter round, or whatever it is. It’s awesome!! So do tell..by the way, I LOVE the camo pants!! You can tell about that too. Love it!

    • says

      I actually had a little issue with normal quarter round so we used door trim instead. It was about the same price (a few pennies difference) and sits up higher to cover the issues we had with old holes and things in the existing trimwork.
      xo – kb

  11. KaraHadley says

    That laundry room looks flipping fantastic. It almost makes you want to do laundry. Almost.

    And I’m totally with you on the floor choice. Sure, it will show more dirt than a dark colored floor or the floor that was in there before, but that also means that when it’s clean, it really feels clean. Those multicolored floors designed to hide dirt never feel clean.

  12. Jane says

    Katie, I love it!! and Look at you!!!! I do not think you will ever slow down. Love all your Ideas. Just found six antique frames at Fish and thought of you. Only paid $12 dollars for them all. We are talking great find in incredible condition. Now to work a little magic and hangs some pictures. Thank you for all the great Ideas.

  13. Holly says

    Looks awesome, I am wanting yo use this exact tile in the herringbone pattern in our new house. And you look awesome!!

  14. Kate S. says

    Holy cats! This looks amazing! I admire your ability and energy (I know you are probably reading that like, ‘what energy?’ during this time. I know I was the same while pregnant but it can seem so hard to remember at times. Anyway, love the tile and room!

  15. Jen says

    I love love love your laundry room! What tile from Lowe’s did you use? You have inspired me to tackle the laundry room on my own (with just a bit of help from my hubby)!
    I have alot of family and friends who were caught in Atlanta’s snowpocalypse. Glad y’all were ok!

  16. jen says

    Hi Katie,

    I know this is an old post, but I am hoping you can answer a question for me. My husband and I are going to tile all the bathrooms in our house over the next few months, and we want to do it ourselves. I have read ALL your tiling posts, and googled, done other research as well. Some people say start on one edge, some say its important to find the exact center and start there. (That seems more difficult to me, to have to find the center, but I want to do it right) What is your advice as far as where to start in a room? Thank you for all of your wonderful info.

    • says

      I think it all depends. On a big space or one that you have centered entrances, I think that it’s important to find the center. On a room like our laundry room (long and skinny with half covered flooring, the center is not the site-line…the ombre wall is. I started on that wall because in the end, it doesn’t matter what the cabinet wall flooring looks like…because it is covered.
      xo – kb

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *